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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
for president bush was of him hugging someone after a natural disaster. you know, the images of katrina, biggest single thing beyond the war in iraq that undermined confidence in president bush's leadership. you cannot get those images out of your head as you watch this stuff. >> except, you know what, katty kay? there is a certain appeal that i think is coming as a relief to people who are tired, who are tired of the vitriol, of the stupidity. and a politician who can work with the other side, isn't that something that in this new age of politics that's appealing? >> it's huge. and i think it's probably almost the overriding priority of whoever gets elected next tuesday is to be able to make this country governable again. and to be able to do that by bringing about a certain amount of cooperation on the things america needs to do between republicans and democrats. we saw it yesterday between chris christie and brearack oba. and it's going to be very interesting to watch today as the campaign trail resumes, whether there's a different tone. i wouldn't be surprised -- we've heard the president us
, of course, the next year faced katrina and a collection of disasters. how does the president keep his head down, not be swept away by the moment, and avoid the mistakes of his four predecessors? >> well, i think what is so sobering -- and this isn't a grand historical vision or a legacy moment -- because for him, the reality is going to be around 1:00 today when he comes out and says what he would do about the fiscal cliff. we can all laugh about the term as much as any of you, but the reality is really grim. when i started going through the numbers yesterday of just what taxpayers -- ordinary taxpayers -- are going to face, i had no idea that it wasn't just the bush tax cuts, even though i follow this stuff pretty closely, the minimum tax hitting, of all people, the most people who will be affected by the amt kicking in if congress were to let it happen. and you've been there, so you know that they'll blink at the last moment. but the most people of any state live in new jersey who are the middle-income people, people who make $75,000 a year and have two children will have to pay $4,000 m
return of fema trailers like those used in the wake of hurricane katrina. gas lines hours long stretched through the weekend across the tri-state area. in some cases stations are now using gas-powered generators to pump the fuel out of the ground. new york governor andrew cuomo says it could be several more days before the region's fuel shortage is resolved. in new york city, where 145,000 households are still without power, yesterday's marathon, of course, as we mentioned, was canceled for the first time in 40 years. that didn't stop, though, as we mentioned at the top of the show hundreds of runners from showing up where the race was supposed to begin in staten island, hit hard there, instead of a marathon, they literally ran a relief effort. jogging through neighborhoods to help dig out debris and offer supplies. and willie, you spent some time on staten island over the weekend as well. >> yeah, i went down on saturday. i went over there. i hopped on the staten island ferry, caught the s-78 bus. these are some of the pictures i took. they're not professional. i just took them with my
.s. history. >> and this is adjusted for inflation. katrina's number has gone up since it originally happened. of course, andrew, florida's benchmark worst storm ever. the other thing to notice, look at all the years this happened, this is all since 1992. >> and four since 20057 four of the top five. >> four since 2005. i just don't golf very much because as you know, i'm not very good at golf. this summer i was golfing with a guy who -- i seen what he did, he was a big republican, he was talking on and on. i said, what do you do? he said, basically, i handle actuarial tables for insurance companies. and i said, well, you know, so how's your business going? and he launches into a 30-minute diatribe on global warming and climate change. i said, you're a republican, and you believe in global warming? he said, i look at the numbers. he said, all of the most expensive storms are -- he said, this is going to cripple us. and it just keeps coming. >> it's a collision of two things. one is, it appears that the planet is warming and that we're having more frequent superstorms. and the population is bo
as the second costliest in u.s. history behind hurricane katrina. >>> front-page story for practically every newspaper in the uk as the bbc sex abuse investigation deepens. the head of the broadcasters news division and her deputy have both stepped aside. over the weekend the network's director general resigned after just 53 days on the job. the resignations come amid a furor of the handling of two separate scandals, one involving late bbc star jimmy savile. he's faced accusations of molestation from over 300 people, many children at the time. the bbc news program "newsnight" is accused of shelving the investigation. >>> "wall street journal," u.s. airlines are on the brink of the most serious shortage of pilots in over 50 years. a new mandatory retirement age of 65 will force many senior pilots into leaving the industry. i don't get that. new pilots will have six times prior flight experiences of predecessors. this as some foreign airlines are actually paying more to lure american aviators abroad. >>> and "the macon telegraph," judy garland's famous dress from "the wizard of oz" fetched $48
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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